Skip to content

Articles

Dogs + Treatment

  • The easiest way to give your dog a liquid medication is to use a treat specially designed for this purpose or mix it with some canned food. To ensure your dog swallows the medication, it is best to hand feed the medicated food or treat, rather than mixing it into a large portion that the dog may not completely consume.

  • The easiest way to give your dog a pill is to hide the pill in food. This usually works best if you hide it in a special treat such as a small amount of canned dog food, peanut butter or cottage cheese. To ensure that your dog swallows the pill, you should hand feed the medicated piece of food or treat rather than offering it in a large portion that the dog may not completely consume.

  • Penetrating trauma typically refers to a deep wound that enters a body cavity such as the abdomen or chest. Most injuries are caused by traumas such as gunshot or arrow wounds, animal fights, impalement on sticks or metal, and automobile accidents. Falls from high places may also result in serious penetrating injuries.

  • A diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) in your dog can feel devastating and even overwhelming. After all, we know that OA is a progressive, degenerative disease that will worsen over time. By most estimates, 20% of all dogs (regardless of age) are affected by OA, making it the most common chronic disease they face. Once a dog is diagnosed with OA, it is important to understand that our focus is management rather than cure. Success means maximizing your dog’s comfort and function while minimizing pain.

  • Providing hospice care for pets as they approach their end of life is a relatively young discipline within veterinary medicine. Although the foundational principles of veterinary hospice care are derived fairly directly from those of human hospice care, there are some critical differences between providing hospice care to a human family member and providing hospice care to an animal family member.

  • Hospice care for pets is an emerging niche of veterinary medicine that creates and relies on a unique caring collaboration between the pet owner and members of the veterinary healthcare team. Pet hospice is patterned after the delivery of the end-of-life care provided for human patients, with the additional provision from the veterinarian for humane euthanasia when the pet’s day-to-day quality of life becomes unacceptable.

  • Kennel cough is a broad term covering any infectious or contagious condition of dogs where coughing is one of the major clinical signs. It is also referred to as infectious tracheobronchitis. The term tracheobronchitis describes the location of the infection in the trachea or "windpipe" and bronchial tubes.

  • LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission Radiation. In short, it is a device that generates a beam of light energy at a specific wavelength. The first laser was developed in, and its use in human surgery became widespread in the late 1980's.

  • Legg-Calve-Perthes disease is also known as avascular or aseptic necrosis of the femoral head. This is a condition in which the head of the femur (the ‘ball’ in the ball-and-socket joint that forms the hip) spontaneously begins to degenerate. Over time, this degeneration will cause collapse of the hip and lead to arthritis.

  • Maropitant is a medication (technically a neurokinin receptor antagonist) that makes stimulation of the vomit center extremely difficult. In dogs 16 weeks and older, it is used to prevent vomiting due to motion sickness and to prevent acute vomiting which may be associated with many illnesses.