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Dogs + Care & Wellness

  • Dogs older than seven years of age are considered senior pets. Senior dogs are in the stage of life in which the aging process is beginning to affect every organ system. Some organs "wear out" faster or are more susceptible to cumulative damage than others, so certain observations are especially important to make.

  • Is your dog lovable, smart, and obedient? Is she/he also really good-looking? If you want others to know just how great your dog is, perhaps you should consider showing them off!

  • Dogs are basically social animals that enjoy the company of their peers. Well-socialized canines are also comfortable around people and adapt readily to various situations. Sociable dogs live happy, care-free lives, so how can you help your dog become better socialized?

  • In years past, if you wanted a dog or cat, you read the newspaper ads or drove to the local pet store. Now, you read online postings or use a search engine instead of a car engine to locate a pet. Times have changed. Shopping methods have changed. But dogs and cats are the same and many of them still need homes. If you are one of the many people who want to adopt, rather than shop for a pet, here are some options for you.

  • We recommend spaying all female pets. The benefits to your pet’s health and to help reduce the pet overpopulation crisis make this decision easier.

  • Cutting a dog’s hair is a matter of good hygiene as much as good style, but there are some spa treatments that can be problematic. Seeking the help of a professional might be the best option for the owner who wants a snazzy-but-healthy dog.

  • Stem cells are unspecialized cells that are capable of renewing themselves though cell division. Under certain conditions, they can become a specific tissue or organ cell. In many tissues, stem cells serve as an internal repair system, replacing damaged or dead tissues by reproducing and turning into the needed cells. This type of repair is common in the gut and bone marrow, where stem cells routinely replace damaged tissues.

  • My dog has struvite bladder stones. What does that mean? Dogs, like people, can develop a variety of bladder and kidney stones. Bladder stones (uroliths or cystic calculi), are rock-like formations of minerals that form in the urinary bladder, and are more common than kidney stones in dogs. One of the more common urolith in the dog is composed of magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate. The more common name for this type of bladder stone is “struvite bladder stone”.

  • Summer is a great time to get outdoors and enjoy nature and the warm sunshine, especially with your pet. Pets are inquisitive creatures and love to investigate their surroundings. Unfortunately, this trait can lead pets down the path of injury and illness. The following information will help you to avoid many summer dangers that can affect your pet.

  • Few events are more frightening for a pet parent than a surgery. Although surgery may sometimes be unavoidable, fortunately our understanding of pet pain - how it occurs, how it affects all body systems, how to prevent it, and how to treat it - has improved dramatically over the past 5 to 10 years.