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Dogs + Care & Wellness

  • Few events are more frightening for a pet parent than a surgery. Although surgery may sometimes be unavoidable, fortunately our understanding of pet pain - how it occurs, how it affects all body systems, how to prevent it, and how to treat it - has improved dramatically over the past 5 to 10 years.

  • The tail is an important part of the canine anatomy and is actually an extension of the spine. This complex tail structure of bone, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels can easily be injured.

  • Of all the tasks performed by veterinary healthcare professionals, trimming nails is one of the least favorite ones. Dogs don’t enjoy nail trimming either so here are a few ways to make trimming nails less stressful for both dogs and humans.

  • Contrary to popular belief, feeling your pet’s ears or nose won’t tell you if his temperature is abnormal. The only surefire way to determine if your pet has an abnormally high or low body temperature is to actually take his temperature with a thermometer.

  • Tapeworms are flat intestinal worms that are made up of many small segments, each about ¼ – ½" (3-5 mm) long. Unlike roundworms that live freely in the intestinal tract, tapeworms attach to the wall of the small intestine using hook-like mouthparts.

  • Plaque is a gummy substance that forms on the teeth within a few hours after a meal. Within 24 hours, plaque begins to harden by combining with salts that are present in the saliva. As the plaque continues to accumulate and mineralize, it eventually transforms into tartar.

  • When you say, “It’s time to walk the dog,” many people assume that your pup needs to potty. Yes, walking the dog is essential to keeping the household carpet unblemished, but taking a stroll with your pooch provides many other benefits.

  • Most people are well-educated about the dangers of smoking. But do they know that second-hand smoke can similarly affect their cats, dogs, and birds?

  • Dental x-rays in dogs are similar to those taken in humans. An x-ray machine using small amounts of radiation, is used to “see” the inside of your dog’s teeth and those areas below the gum line that are hidden from view.

  • A lustrous coat signals vitality and can indicate the health status of a pet. Pets with a dry, flaky, or unkempt coat may be suffering from conditions such as thyroid disease, hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing’s disease), kidney or liver disease, or nutritional disorders (for more information on these conditions and how they can affect your pet’s skin, see the individual handouts as well as “Coat and Skin Appearance in the Healthy Dog”). In fact, one of the main ways your veterinarian assesses the health of your dog or cat is by looking at the condition of her coat and skin.