Skip to content

Articles

Cats + Diagnosis

  • Serum is the liquid portion of blood from which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and factors involved in blood clotting have been removed.

  • Blood pressure measurement evaluates the pressure against the walls of arteries during the time the heart contracts and empties itself of blood, as well as during the time the heart relaxes and fills with blood. “Systemic hypertension” describes high blood pressure throughout the entire body.

  • “Abdominal enlargement” is a general term that means a cat’s belly is larger or fuller than usual and bulges beyond the normal outline of the body. Abdominal enlargement may develop for many reasons depending on the age and gender of the cat.

  • Coughing can have many different causes. The search for answers starts with a complete history and physical examination. Additional diagnostic tests may be needed and your veterinarian may recommend doing screening tests. These are a series of simple tests that provide information about the overall health of the pet and may provide further clues about the underlying problem.

  • Decreased appetite (inappetence) and listlessness (lethargy or lack of energy) are seen with many different diseases and conditions. The first step is to determine if the underlying problem is medical or non-medical in nature.

  • There are many different diseases and disorders that can cause diarrhea pets. It can be as simple as a pet having intestinal parasites (“worms”) or eating spoiled food. However, in many cases the cause is more difficult to determine.

  • Fever of unknown origin is a term that is generally used to refer to a persistent fever of greater than 39.7 °C (103.5 °F) for which the underlying cause is not readily evident.

  • Heartworm disease is a parasitic disease that typically affects dogs but can occasionally occur in cats. Heartworm parasites, known by the scientific name of Dirofilaria immitis, are long thin worms that live in the right side of the heart and the pulmonary arteries, the large blood vessels that carry blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs.

  • The causes of inappropriate urination include diseases (infections, tumors) affecting the kidneys, bladder and genital tract, endocrine diseases such as diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, Cushing's disease and estrogen responsive urinary incontinence, as well as neurological disease and behavioral problems.

  • Increased appetite is completely normal in pets that have high energy requirements, such as growing puppies and kittens, pets that exercise strenuously such as hunting dogs, and pregnant or nursing females. Also, pets eating a poor quality food may eat more to meet their energy requirements.