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Horses

  • The suspensory ligament supports the fetlock and protects it from hyperextension (i.e., dropping too low) at exercise. The ligament begins at its attachment to the back of the upper cannon bone in both the fore and hindlimbs.

  • Sweet Itch is a skin disease (sometimes called summer itch or seasonal allergic dermatitis) and is caused by an allergy to the saliva of certain biting flies or midges (e.g., Culicoides spp.).

  • Tendons are the strap-like structures that attach muscles to the bones on which they act. Most tendons are short and rarely damaged. However, the long tendons of the limbs are very vulnerable to damage during exercise or as a result of direct trauma.

  • Tetanus is a bacterial disease that can affect most animals and humans. Horses are particularly susceptible because of their environment and tendency to suffer injuries.

  • If your favorite mare is about to produce her first foal, the event you’ve been anticipating with so much excitement may suddenly become rather frightening. What if something goes wrong?

  • Therapy pets are animals that visit hospitals, retirement homes, hospice centers, nursing homes and schools. Although most therapy pets are dogs, other species such as cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and horses are good candidates. These lovable pets are well trained, have good temperaments, and are people-friendly. Plus, they have a good work ethic!

  • Thrush is an unpleasant infection of the horse’s frog that is predisposed by moist, damp, dirty ground or stall conditions.

  • This is a common condition, invariably associated with exercise, that most frequently causes hindlimb stiffness, but can affect any of the muscles of the skeleton. Other medical terminologies include ‘acute myopathy’ and ‘rhabdomyolysis’.

  • Urticaria or ‘hives’ is a common skin condition in which well-defined raised areas (lumps, wheals or rings) occur in the superficial dermis (an upper layer of the skin). Mostly these areas are quite small but in severe cases whole areas such as the face or one or more of the limbs may become swollen.

  • A vaccine is a specially-made medicine that stimulates the body to produce an immune response to a particular infection. Most vaccines are given by injection of a small volume of liquid into the muscle, although there are a few given intranasally (i.e., via the nostril) (strangles vaccine), or by mouth (e.g., polio vaccine in humans).