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Medical Conditions

  • Skin cancers are fairly common in cats, but cutaneous lymphoma is quite uncommon. Only about 3% of lymphoma cases in cats occur in the skin.

  • Cyanosis is defined as a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes of the body, caused by inadequate oxygen levels. Treatment will depend upon the underlying reason for the low oxygen levels.

  • Dogs, like people, can develop a variety of bladder and kidney stones. Bladder stones (uroliths or cystic calculi), are rock-like formations of minerals that form in the urinary bladder, and are more common than kidney stones in dogs. A somewhat rare form of urolith in the dog is composed of cystine crystals.

  • Cystitis is a general term referring to inflammation in the urinary bladder. The term cystitis does not imply a specific underlying cause.

  • By definition cystitis means inflammation of the bladder, and the term is used as a general description for any disease that causes inflammation.

  • The spinal cord is one of the most important and sensitive organ systems in the body. If it is damaged, the nerve cells do not regenerate but are replaced with fibrous or scar tissue. Spinal cord injuries usually result in permanent, irreversible damage.

  • A joint connects two or more bones together. Most joints in the body are mobile, allowing the bones to move in relationship to each other. The vast majority of moveable joints are held together by an outer layer of tough fibrous tissue called the "joint capsule".

  • As our pets age, the tissues lining the joints may deteriorate and degenerate. Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD) refers to arthritis or osteoarthritis, which is the result of the gradual deterioration of the articular cartilage within one or more the joints.

  • This disease, also known as degenerative myelopathy (DM) or chronic degenerative radiculomyelopathy (CDRM), is a disease affecting the spinal cord, resulting in slowly progressive hind limb weakness and paralysis.

  • Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen by veterinarians. Approximately two-thirds of cats over three years of age have some degree of dental disease. The most common problems are due to periodontal disease, gingivitis and cervical neck lesions, also called oral resorptive lesions.