Skip to content

Articles

Medical Conditions

  • Dental disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen by veterinarians. Over 80% of dogs over the age of three have active dental disease. Few dogs show obvious signs of dental disease, so it’s up to the dog’s family and veterinarian to uncover this hidden and often painful condition.

  • Dermatomyositis is an inherited disease of the skin, muscles, and blood vessels that causes dramatic inflammation of these tissues in the body. While the exact pathologic mechanisms of dermatomyositis are unknown, an immune-mediated process may be involved.

  • There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus ("weak or watery diabetes") and diabetes mellitus ("sugar diabetes").

  • Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This small organ located near the stomach has two different types of cells that have very different functions. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion.

  • This handout provides general information about diabetes mellitus in dogs. For information about its treatment, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment" and "Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment".

  • This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. For more information about diabetes mellitus, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information", and "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment".

  • Diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. In dogs, diabetes mellitus is usually Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 2 Diabetes)

  • Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal.

  • Diabetes is a complex disease involving a hormone called insulin. When a cat does not make enough insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it does make, diabetes results. Diabetic remission occurs when a cat maintains a normal glucose level for more than four weeks without insulin injections or oral glucose regulating medications.

  • Diarrhea is the passage of feces as unformed or loose stools, usually in increased volume and frequency of passage. It is a result of increased speed of passage of fecal material through the intestine combined with decreased absorption of water, nutrients and electrolytes.