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  • Feline miliary dermatitis is a general term used to describe a skin condition in cats that most commonly results from an allergic reaction. Since the most common allergic dermatitis or skin allergy in the cat is flea allergy dermatitis, the two terms have become synonymous. The term miliary means resembling millet seeds.

  • Feline vestibular disease is a condition in which a cat suddenly develops incoordination, falling or circling to one side, involuntary darting of the eyes back and forth (nystagmus), a head tilt, and often nausea or vomiting. These clinical signs usually appear suddenly, many times in less than an hour.

  • Common conditions of pet ferrets include diarrhea, intestinal foreign bodies, parasites, heart disease, and various kinds of tumors.

  • There are four major hormonal diseases in ferrets. Two of these diseases are covered in separate handouts, namely abnormally high levels of estrogen associated with persistent estrus in female ferrets (see Ferrets – Reproductive diseases), and abnormally high levels of insulin associated with the pancreatic tumor called insulinoma (see Ferrets – Tumors).

  • Ferrets have several unique problems; understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care problems.

  • Ferrets are susceptible to a number of different diseases of the respiratory system. The symptoms of respiratory disease are similar, regardless of the cause. Some respiratory diseases can be fatal, and it is important to attempt to determine the cause of disease in order to determine a prognosis.

  • Most skin diseases in ferrets are associated with parasites - fleas, mites and ticks. Ferrets may also develop bacterial skin disease if the skin is traumatized, and they are susceptible to tumors such as squamous cell carcinoma and mast cell tumors.

  • Gastrointestinal disease occurs commonly in ferrets - from dental disease, through gastrointestinal foreign bodies to persistent diarrhea. Some, such as foreign bodies, are readily prevented, while others require considerable diagnostic investigation and may need long-term treatment.

  • Reproductive disease in ferrets is rare today, as most pet ferrets are spayed or neutered at a young age. One disease still seen occasionally in pet ferrets occurs in females that are not spayed.

  • Fever is a term that refers to an elevated body temperature. The normal body temperature range for cats is between 100.5°F and 102.5°F (38.1°C to 39.2°C). To be classified as a fever of unknown origin (FUO), the body temperature must be above 103.5°F (39.7°C) on at least four occasions over a fourteen-day period, accompanied by an illness of at least fourteen days' duration without an obvious cause.