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Medications

  • Topical ear medications are often necessary to adequately treat inflammatory or infectious ear conditions.

  • The proper administration of eye medication is critical in helping your cat quickly recover from an eye injury or infection. Make sure you have carefully read the drug label and understand the prescription instructions.

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your pet's prompt recovery. Make sure you have carefully read the label and understand the prescription instructions. If you have any questions, contact your veterinarian for clarification.

  • How to properly administer eye medications to your dog.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. The information provided in this handout may help make treating your pet easier - for both of you.

  • Our dogs are part of the family. So, it’s understandable that we reach for human medications when they feel poorly. Before you share the contents of your medicine cabinet with your dog, here are some tips regarding common over-the-counter medications.

  • Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent used to treat mild to moderate pain, to reduce inflammation and to reduce fever. In veterinary medicine, it is prescribed most commonly to treat blood clots in cats.

  • Atenolol is primarily used to treat heart disease in cats and dogs and to lower blood pressure. It is a beta1-blocking agent. Atenolol decreases the heart’s need for blood and oxygen and therefore reduces the amount of work the heart must do. It also helps the heart beat more regularly.

  • Atropine sulfate is used in the eye to dilate the pupil. It may also be used to control pain in the eye due to corneal and uveal disease and in treating secondary glaucoma.

  • Azathioprine is used to suppress the immune system. It is used to treat diseases and disorders caused by an overactive immune system. Examples of conditions the medication may be used for include immune mediated skin disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarthritis, polymyositis, eosinophilic enteritis, myasthenia gravis, atrophic gastritis, ulcerative colitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ocular histiocytoma, and chronic active hepatitis. When taking this medication, your pet may become more susceptible to infections. If possible, keep your pet away from stray animals or animals that may have an infection.