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Surgical Conditions

  • Juvenile hyperparathyroidism is a rare, inherited condition of German Shepherds. This condition causes the parathyroid glands, four small glands that are located in the neck near the thyroid gland, to produce abnormally large amounts of parathyroid hormone.

  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is a condition that is also commonly referred to as "dry eye." The medical term means inflammation of the cornea and surrounding tissues from drying. It is a common eye condition resulting from inadequate production of the aqueous portion of the tear film by the lacrimal gland and/or gland of the third eyelid gland.

  • Lameness refers to an inability to properly use one or more limbs. It is most often associated with pain or injury. The most common causes of acute or sudden lameness in dogs are injury to a joint, bone fracture or dislocation. Osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia may also cause lameness in dogs.

  • LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission Radiation. In short, it is a device that generates a beam of light energy at a specific wavelength. The first laser was developed in 1960, and its use in human surgery became widespread in the late 1980's.

  • LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission Radiation. In short, it is a device that generates a beam of light energy at a specific wavelength. The first laser was developed in, and its use in human surgery became widespread in the late 1980's.

  • Legg-Calve-Perthes disease is also known as avascular or aseptic necrosis of the femoral head. This is a condition in which the head of the femur (the ‘ball’ in the ball-and-socket joint that forms the hip) spontaneously begins to degenerate. Over time, this degeneration will cause collapse of the hip and lead to arthritis.

  • Also known as acral lick dermatitis, this problem begins as an area of hair loss and reddened skin most commonly on the top of the wrist or carpal joint on the front legs. It often looks like a "hot spot." These differ from "hot spots" in that they persist despite treatment.

  • The term 'foreign body' refers to any non-food object located within the digestive tract of a dog or cat. Our pets have the tendency to play with or chew on non-food objects and, in the process of doing so, these objects can be inadvertently ingested. One especially dangerous type of foreign body, most common in cats, is referred to as a linear foreign body.

  • The knee joint connects the femur, or thighbone, and the tibia, or shinbone. The patella, or “kneecap,” is normally located in a groove called the trochlear groove, found at the end of the femur.

  • The patella, or "kneecap," is normally located in a groove on the end of the femur, or thighbone just above the stifle (or knee). The term luxating means "out of place" or "dislocated". Therefore, a luxating patella is a kneecap that moves out of its normal location. It generally resumes its normal anatomical orientation after only a brief period of luxation in most dogs.